Full-Time MBA Core Curriculum

Summer
Pre-MBA Prep

Quantitative tools


Boot camp

Fall Semester
Session A
Sprint Week
1 credit
Session B
Data Analysis

2 Credits


The aim of this course is to supply the student with the analytical tools needed to succeed in business. The material will be closely coordinated and integrated with the other course offerings in the first year core (economics, marketing, finance, etc.). The course covers the tools that are necessary to analyze and understand the implications of collected data. These include probability distributions, hypothesis testing, correlation and covariance analysis, ANOVA, simple and multiple regression, and forecasting. Emphasis will be placed on a student's ability to apply the appropriate tool to collected data and to understand and interpret the results of their analyses.

Communicating for Results

2 Credits


Being a successful leader in business or the professions requires effective communication skills. The need to communicate well is critical. This course covers topics relating to the personal awareness and development of communication abilities, as well as, an appreciation of audience analyses, message and content development, structure opportunities to develop their communication skills by writing, speaking, and increasing their insight and knowledge of the communication process.

LDE Leadership Development and Ethics

2 Credits


The LDE program is intended to help students enhance their professional effectiveness by promoting personal development and the understanding and practice of key leadership skills. Through a range of experiential activities students will cultivate an understanding of their unique strengths, learn how they show up behaviorally and develop skills to push their edge in acting on their values and promoting ethical conduct. In this program, students will be paired with a Mason EP who will provide personalized coaching to both support and challenge them as they engage in a range of assessments, exercises and simulations.

Financial Accounting & Disclosure

2 Credits


This course develops students' ability to measure, communicate and interpret financial information. Financial accounting provides the most comprehensive source of information used to assess an organization's past performance and future prospects. Specifically, financial accounting focuses on the financial statements and related disclosures prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Rather than solely focusing on technical competencies, this course also emphasizes the underlying rationale for accounting practices and the effectiveness of these practices. As such, attention is given to contemporary issues in financial reporting, the use of judgment in financial accounting, and the economic consequences of reporting choices.

Financial Management

2 Credits


This course provides students an introduction to important financial concepts critical to both investing and running a successful business. Students will gain and understanding of various financial markets, as well as different approaches to calculating risk and return. Valuable corporate finance skills will be developed to prepare students to become successful financial managers. Financial analysis and forecasting, project evaluation, and financial policy are some of the topics to be covered. The primary objectives of the course are to provide a framework for students to approach the financial decisions they will face in the future careers and to build a solid foundation for graduate students interested in pursuing more advanced coursework in the field.

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Marketing Management

2 Credits


Focuses on developing integrated marketing programs that address customer needs, competitive activity, channel and supplier behavior, macro environmental factors, and market evolution. Emphasis is placed on assessing the market and developing a responsive marketing mix: product policy, pricing, channels of distribution, integrated marketing communications, and support structure.

Economic Analysis and Insights

2 Credits


Decision-making is one of the most crucial roles of managers in public and private firms, large and small. This course draws on microeconomics to develop concepts and techniques that help managers allocate resources efficiently and determine appropriate strategies across their organization including pricing, production, and marketing in the context of various competitive market conditions. This is an applied course where students are actively engaged in using the concepts being covered, culminating in a major team project/presentation.

Organizational Behavior & Processes

2 Credits


Designed to provide you with the analytic frameworks and tools to diagnose events in and to take effective action in today's changing organizations. The course draws on knowledge from the domains of Organization Behavior (OB), Organization Theory (OT), and Human Resource Management (HRM) to provide you with the understanding and skill that yo need to be an effective manager of people in these changing organizations. OT, OB, and HRM are concerned with developing understanding about how human beings act in organized settings and how organized systems affect human behavior through policies, structures and strategies. In addition to conceptual understanding, ongoing assessments and experiential exercises provide you opportunities to reflect on your own behavior in order to develop new and more effective ways of interacting with others to accomplish work.

Winter Break
Optional coursework and experiential immersions
Spring Semester
Session C
Sprint Week
1 credit
Session D
Business, Govt and the Global Economy

2 Credits


This course introduces the basic macroeconomic concepts in the global economy for both industrialized and developing countries. Students are encouraged to analyze business and economic policies and money and capital markets.

Accounting for Decision Making

2 Credits


This course develops students' ability to prepare accounting information that enhances decision-making within organizations. The accounting information is non-financial as well as financial, primarily forward- looking, generally model-based, assembled in reference to the needs of managers within an organization (as opposed to regulators, creditors, or shareholders), and often disaggregated to enable various analyses (on products, services, activities, divisions, tasks, operations, etc.) to be performed, which support the performance of management planning and control functions. The course emphasizes managerial decision-making and control of operations using accounting information systems. Included are basic accounting concepts, accounting for manufacturing and investment decisions, and designing management control systems to implement strategies (e.g., transfer pricing, balanced scorecard.)

Operations & Supply Chain Management

2 Credits


This course introduces students to Operations Management, one of the major functional areas of business. Operations Management is devoted to how an organization efficiently converts resources into products and services. These resources include an organization's facilities, workforce, equipment, information, and materials. The course will use two perspectives to explore Operations Management. The first is the "process" view- a set of activities and resources that transform inputs into outputs. We will explore how to design, analyze, and control business processes within a firm. The second half of this course will use the supply chain - a network of firms that source, make, and deliver the product or service to the customer - as the overarching model to explore the latest operations-related initiatives.

Information Technology Infrastructure & Business Transformation

2 Credits


This course has two foci related to information technology, the first emphasizing information and the second emphasizing technology. In the first focus, students will gain an understanding of how IT enables fundamental transformations in firms, markets, products and business processes through readings and case discussions. These transformations have important implications for the way companies organize (both internally and with customers and suppliers) and compete. Accordingly, this focus addresses the management issues surrounding the impact of information technology in organizations and is designed with the line and general managers in mind, rather than the managers of the IT function. The objective in the technology focus is to provide students with advanced skills in the computer technologies of the modern workplace - namely spreadsheets and databases. When applied creatively, these technologies enable more efficient execution, enhance decision making and support the design of more effective business processes, all of which are essential for success in an increasingly competitive business environment.

Global Competitive Strategy

2 Credits


The objective of this course is for graduate business students to better develop the capacity to think strategically about a company, its business position, and how it gains sustainable competitive advantages in the global environment. In so doing, students will be exposed to the issues that influence the competitive behavior and performance of organizations. Skills will be developed and applied in conducting strategic analysis in a variety of industry and competitive situations by analyzing and crafting business strategies through case studies and class discussion. The primary outcome of this course is for students to be able to apply a manager's strategic perspective to the resolution of major business problems at different levels within the organization, with the goal of improving organizational performance.

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Electives

4 Credits


Students will choose 2 electives for a total of 4 credits

Career Management

1 Credit